DIAGNOSIS

What Is A Bunion?

A bunion is a bump that forms on the inside of the foot when the big toe moves and pushes against the next toe.

While bunions are hereditary, tight and pointy-toed shoes can lead to further pain and deformity. The main symptom is usually pain and redness at the bump itself, but patients may also feel pain at the ball of the foot, and stiffness in the big toe joint. Symptoms often progress as the bunion becomes more severe with a more prominent bump and big toe deviation under or over the smaller toes.

Symptoms

In the early stages of bunion formation, symptoms may be mild.

As bunions progress, most people notice the bony prominence that may be red and tender. If left untreated, symptoms may progress and eventually contribute to other deformities within the foot.

THE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF A BUNION INCLUDE:

A bulging bump at the base of your big toe

Swelling, redness and/or soreness around your big toe joint

Corns or calluses — these often develop where the first and second toes overlap

Persistent or intermittent pain with shoe wear

Restricted movement of your big toe

Decreased activity level due to foot pain

What Causes
Bunions?

There are many theories about why bunions develop, but the exact cause is unknown.

FACTORS LIKELY INCLUDE:

  • Inherited foot type
  • Tight and ill-fitting shoes
  • Prior injury

Bunions might also be associated with certain types of arthritis, particularly inflammatory types, such as rheumatoid arthritis.

Risk Factors

These factors might increase your risk of bunions or make the deformity worse:

High heels

Wearing high heels forces your toes into the front of your shoes, often crowding your toes

Ill-fitting shoes

People who wear shoes that are too tight, too narrow, or too pointed are more susceptible to bunions

Rheumatoid arthritis

Having this inflammatory condition can make you more susceptible to bunions

Heredity

The tendency to develop bunions might be because of an inherited structural foot defect

During a clinical exam, your doctor will X-ray your foot to determine the severity of your condition along with any other conditions.

WHERE DO YOU FALL ON THE

Bunion Severity Scale

Mild

Slight bump begins to form on the side of the foot and the skin may appear slightly red in color. Bunion may be unnoticed by the patient at this stage.

Moderate

Bump on the side of the foot becomes more prominent, skin is red in color. Patients may experience pain or difficulty when wearing shoes or walking.

Severe

Bony bump is prominent, big toe deviates toward other toes, potentially creating other deformities spread throughout the foot.

What If I Do Nothing?

During the early stages, your pain can be managed but it will typically worsen and you may develop some additional symptoms, including:

Arthritis

Calluses

Toes cross over

Hammertoes

Bone Spurs

Ball Of Foot Pain

Ok, What Are My Treatment Options?

1. Non-surgical
treatments

2. Traditional
open surgery

3. Centrolock® bunion correction

3. Centrolock® bunion correction

These treatments are designed to keep you more comfortable, but will not correct the deformity. Conservative treatments include:
• Toe spacers
• Pads/splints
• Inserts/Orthotics

During a traditional open bunion surgery, the surgeon opens your skin using large 2 to 6-inch incisions in order to access the bones, tendons, and ligaments in your foot.
This increases the risk of scarring, stiffness, and more pain after the procedure. In more severe bunions, the surgeon may choose to fuse the midfoot, therefore extending duration of recovery.

Pecaplasty® bunion correction procedure uses tiny (⅛ – ¼ inch) incisions (minimally invasive). Your surgeon performs the bunion correction with far less soft tissue disruption leading to a faster and less painful recovery than traditional open bunion procedures.

VIEW OUR PROCEDURE

Centrolock® bunion correction procedure uses tiny (⅛ – ¼ inch) incisions (minimally invasive). Your surgeon performs the bunion correction with far less soft tissue disruption leading to a faster and less painful recovery than traditional open bunion procedures.

VIEW OUR PROCEDURE

TO FIND THE RIGHT DOCTOR FOR YOU
USE OUR SURGEON LOCATOR

Lam P, Lee M, Xing J, Di Nallo M. Percutaneous Surgery for Mild to Moderate Hallux Valgus. Foot Ankle Clin N Am 2016; 21: 459-477 (data only with respect to chevron osteotomy procedure).

Lee M, Walsh J, Smith MM, Ling J, Wines A, Lam P. Hallux Valgus Correction Comparing Percutaneous Chevron/Akin (PECA) and Open Scarf/Akin Osteotomies. Foot Ankle Intl 2017; 38(8): 838-846 (data only with respect to chevron osteotomy procedure).

Maffulli N, Longo UG, Oliva F, Denaro V, Coppola C. Bosch Osteotomy and Scarf Osteotomy for Hallux Valgus Correction. Orthop Clin North Am. 2009 Oct;40(4):515-24, ix-x. doi:10.1016/j.ocl.2009.06.003.